Ten Tips for ADHD at Early Age



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    Ten Tips for ADHD at Early Age

    Difficulty in maintaining proper attention and concentration is a common development disorder among children. Virtually every classroom has two or three students with this problem and it impacts the child’s ability to function in most areas of his daily life • Full Article

    The child is already more than six months old. He’s passed the colicky stage, yet he continues to cry incessantly. It’s possible that this stems from sensory processing disorder. Parents should patiently try and see if there are certain clothes without which the child is calmer. An embrace or a loving touch will also help to soothe him.

    The child wakes up several times during the night or his afternoon nap is unusually short. Every little thing disturbs him. Try and put him to sleep in a dark and totally quiet room.

    Your child is now two years old. While he’s known how to walk for some time, he bumps into things and is prone to falling. Remove all stumbling blocks and make certain that potentially dangerous items are nowhere in sight. When you go out with him in public don’t take your eyes off of him.

    You had your child’s hearing tested and he hears fine. Nevertheless, when you call him, it takes him a long time to react. It often appears as if he can’t hear you at all. There’s no reason to get angry at him. Any time you want something from him, turn towards him. Start speaking with him only when you’re certain that he’s looking at you attentively.

    Your child doesn’t like to be in an unfamiliar environment, always preferring what is known and familiar. This derives from a high level of sensitivity and proneness to distraction. Make certain that when you come to a new place keep your child close by and give him special treatment. It’s always appropriate to prepare the child before leaving. Don’t talk to him in riddles; speak clearly and in particulars.

    Your child has a tendency for frequent angry outbursts. His thoughts are a jumble and his reactions are impulsive. It appears that even in seemingly commonplace situations he becomes impatient and reacts angrily. It would be appropriate to keep things in proper balance when dealing with him; no need to be stubborn about everything. Choose a few things that are very principled for you, and remain as steady as a rock on them – firm but considerate. In this manner, the child will learn that he gains nothing by his angry outbursts.

    Children have many fears and anxieties according to their age and development, while some show a reckless disregard for danger, e.g., climbing tall trees or poles. Listen to your child, show firmness in potentially dangerous circumstances, and be alert. This is a stage that usually passes with time.

    There are children who need things to be done in a certain way, and if not, they become uneasy. Similarly, it’s hard for the child to get organized in the morning, promptly or not, and when he tries to do so, he cries and feels pressured. This comes from a high propensity to distraction and organization difficulties. Try and help him with a clear checklist of morning tasks for getting organized. Similarly, make certain that his room contains a minimum of items that can possibly distract his attention. In addition, have his clothes prepared beforehand, preferably before he goes to sleep.

    Your child sustains a serious fall and doesn’t cry, while on other occasions, he bursts into tears and becomes hysterical at the slightest touch, as if someone punched him. Sometimes, the child refuses to touch sand, mud, clay, etc., or he feels a need to touch such material to the point of even eating them. Such children are suffering from sensory processing disorder. Many of them put paint peelings in their mouths. It would be appropriate to take such children to see an occupational therapist as a means of exposing them to things that can counterbalance this inclination.

    Some children have difficulty tying their shoelaces or with any other form of weaving. This is another case for the occupational therapist. In the meantime, the child should wear shoes with Velcro strips. Before buying clothes for the child, it’s always a good idea to find out what’s most comfortable for him.

    In conclusion, it’s important never to get angry with your child because of these difficulties. It’s hard enough for him to handle such challenges. However, you must always remember that G-d created him and he can’t change who he is, especially not at a young age. Furthermore, he’s not to blame for this. All your stubbornness in this matter will merely deepen his frustration and stress. Quite often, the child himself doesn’t understand what’s bothering him, and therefore, it would be appropriate to bring him into the picture and let him talk about it.

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    Ten Tips for ADHD at Early Age



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